9/20/18

What's in a name? -- The Maremma

What's in a name? What English speakers call the Maremma actually has other names.
This Maremma belongs to Bradley in Australia.
The official name for the breed is
From: The Fédération Cynologique Internationale, the World Canine Organization, founded in 1911.

It is a breed of livestock guardian dog indigenous to central Italy, particularly to (1) Abruzzo and (2) the Maremma region of Tuscany and Lazio.

The literal English translation of the name is "The dog of the shepherds of the Maremma and Abruzzese region".

Is sometimes referred to simply as the Maremmano or Abruzzese Sheepdog. 

Can be abbreviated as "Pma." 

The English name of the breed is Maremma Sheepdog, per The Kennel Club, "the UK’s largest organisation dedicated to protecting and promoting the health and welfare of all dogs."  

The English name of the breed derives from that of the Maremma marshlands, where, until recently, shepherds, dogs and hundreds of thousands of sheep over-wintered [part of the ancient process of transhumance].

"The Maremma is a coastal area of western central Italy, bordering the Tyrrhenian Sea. It includes much of south-western Tuscany and part of northern Lazio. It was formerly mostly marsh-land, often malarial, but was drained and reclaimed as part of the Battle for Land under the Fascist régime of the early twentieth century."

From Wikipedia: Maremma_Sheepdog
From The Kennel Club: Maremma Sheepdog 
From FCI Nomenclature: Standards #201
The area of Italy in which the Maremma is located.
The Maremma area in which
the marshes were located.




The modern route between the Maremmano and Abruzzo areas.
The Abruzzo region of Italy.

9/19/18

"My dogs know."

I saw this on Facebook but couldn't find info on photographer or writer. This probably isn't a Kuvasz, but I'm pretty sure it's a Livestock Guardian Dog. Unless it's a white/cream Golden Retriever. The sentiment is beautiful, no matter the breed.

102,000 views of Kuvasz Klips!

There have now been 102,000 views of Kuvasz Klips! Thanks for sharing your photos and thanks for viewing!
They're not really cheering for Kuvasz Klips. They're Hungarian Olympians celebrating their gold medal win.

Baronesz and Bazsarózsa

Csilla A. of Kulcsos Lujza Kuvasz Kennel in Hungary shares this photo of her Baronesz és Bazsarózsa (Baron and Peony). She writes, "Their happy little faces are drawn to a smile like the one who has been enchanted by a fairy."

6-month-old pup meets sheep

Pusztatenki kuvasz! 6 hetesek lettünk.
la K. in Hungary shares this photo of his 6-month-old Kuvasz puppies meeting his farm's sheep.

9/15/18

6th annual "Day of Kuvasz Loyalty"

This photo shows the Hungarian countryside in the 1930s, only a few years before World War II and the Soviet army invasion. They obviously are in no way able to fight off the oncoming Soviet army of tanks and machine guns and thousands of troops.
A KUVASZ ÉS MI ALAPITVÁNY on Facebook created the idea for a memorial day for the Kuvaszok who died in World War II. He chose September 15 for the anniversary date, and in 2013 held the first walk in Budapest to honor the brave Kuvaszok who died defending their owners' property from invading Soviet soldiers. 

DAY OF KUVASZ LOYALTY, SEPT. 15, 2018
by A KUVASZ ÉS MI ALAPITVÁNY, The Kuvasz and We Non-Profit Foundation

On this day we would remember to those Kuvaszes and other breeds of dogs who sacrificed their life for those who were the most important for them, for people. 

Why September 15th?

Because around this time in the autumn of 1944 the Soviet army stepped into the area of the Karpathian basin and started the biggest known slaughter of the Kuvasz population. We at A KUVASZ ÉS MI ALAPITVÁNY in Budapest would like if this not so well-known historical fact would not sink into oblivion.

For those who do not know about this period, we would sum up what happened from the autumn in 1944, here and on our Facebook page at A KUVASZ ÉS MI ALAPITVÁNY:

In the middle of September 1944 started the marching of the Soviet army from more directions into the Karpathian basin. Crowds of people fled from their farms and left the small villages when they heard about the arrival of the front lines. Besides saving the lives of people, saving the guarding kuvaszes as well was out of the question. 

Most of the people hoped that the Kuvasz would hide when they heard the noise of the guns, or run away, and when the tenants got home they would return, so they might survive the passing of the army. 

The people who returned days and weeks after the army left the area, saw that the dogs (other breed than kuvasz) survived the brutality of the troops. 

But coming home they had to face reality, most of the Kuvaszes lied shot down near the fence. The Kuvaszes left behind tried to save the home of their owners!!! 

The warning shots were useless, the roaring tanks, the rumbling guns did not frighten them away. When everybody ran away, they protected with loyalty what they had been entrusted to guard. Entering to the Karpathian basin, it soon spread among the foreign soldiers that the big white dogs had to be shot because they did not let anyone to enter, and could seriously injure the attacker. 

According to estimations from the autumn of 1944 to the spring of 1945 THOUSANDS OF KUVASZES GAVE THEIR LIFE FOR ACTING THE WAY THEY HAD BEEN TAUGHT BY THEIR OWNERS!

6th annual "Day of Kuvasz Loyalty" -- History of Soviet occupation of Hungary, from Wikipedia

From Wikipedia:  "In September 1944, Soviet forces crossed the Hungarian border. On 15 October, Horthy announced that Hungary had signed an armistice with the Soviet Union. The Hungarian army ignored the armistice, fighting desperately to keep the Soviets out."
To read more, click on this link:

6th annual "Day of Kuvasz Loyalty" -- KFA shares movie clip of Kuv in WW2

In the movie "Brady's Escape," this Hungarian man hugs his bloody, dead Kuvasz that had just been shot by a Nazi soldier. The Hungarian man explained to the Nazi's interpreter, who then told the Nazi, "They're Kuvasz. He says they're too dangerous. They'll kill us."
Kuvasz Fanciers of America shares this video clip from the movie "Brady's Escape." 

From KFA:  "These clips from "Brady's Escape" have been edited together to show how working kuvasz nearly became extinct during WWII. Please visit KuvaszInfo.com to find out more about becoming involved with efforts to save this ancient breed."

Click here to see the "Brady's Escape" movie clip about Kuvasz. The Kuvasz first appear at the 10:00 mark.

It was made in Hungary in 1983 and shown in the U.S. in 1984.

Here's a review of the movie on IMDB.com: 

"Given the low budget and production limitations, this movie is very good. It is plausible, realistic, and shows how the Csikos (Hungarian horsemen who lived on the plains (puszta) risked their lives to save a downed American pilot from the ruthless and savage Nazis. We are drawn into strong feelings for the young, impressionable, yet highly courageous boy--who admires the American pilot. If you're looking for special effects, superman heroes, and magical endings--this movie is not for you. If you want to feel what it must have been like to dodge the persistent, amoral Nazis and their lack of compassion, then you will be enthralled by this movie. I truly enjoyed it and for those who love horses, dogs, and humble, helpful people who value freedom and those who aspire to that end, this movie will be one you'll remember for a long time."

Taglines:

 A soldier who became a hero. A boy who became a man. An escape that became a legend.


6th annual "Day of Kuvasz Loyalty" -- Commemoration from Brazil

 Paulo G. of Canilkuvaszok.com.br, Kuvaszok Kennel Brazil shares this commemoration to honor the "Day of Kuvasz Loyalty."

6th annual "Day of Kuvasz Loyalty" -- Kuvasz at the royal palace in Buda

 Zoli of A Kuvasz és Mi Alapitvány in Hungary shares this. He created the "Day of Kuvasz Loyalty" in 2013 and I want to support him in this great endeavor every year.

A Kuvasz és Mi Alapitvány means The Kuvasz and We Foundation, founded by Zoltán V.

6th annual "Day of Kuvasz Loyalty" -- Commemoration from Sweden

Lena of Czaruso Kuvasz Kennel in Sweden commemorates 2018's "Day of Kuvasz Loyalty."

9/13/18

Transhumance process with sheep in Iceland - video










"September brings réttir—the nationwide roundup where people on foot, ATVs or Icelandic horses retrieve their stock from the mountains and valleys, aided by trusty sheepdogs. The grueling endeavor sometimes requires days in the saddle, and entire communities turn out in support." From: celebrating-rettir.

This is Réttir in Iceland, the transhumance process of moving sheep from their summer grazing grounds to their winter shelters. There are no Livestock Guardian Dogs needed, as the only lamb predator in Iceland would be the Arctic_fox, which generally eats smaller mammals, eggs, birds and plants. In spite of there being no LGDs in this country, I'm including this for educational purposes.


"The Icelandic Sheepdog is a breed of dog of spitz type originating from the dogs brought to Iceland by the Vikings. It is of similar type to the Norwegian Buhund, the Shetland Sheepdog, and the Welsh Corgi. They are commonly used to herd sheep in the Icelandic countryside....In the Icelandic landscape, sheep often get lost and it has historically been the dog's job to find them and return them to the herd. They are, therefore, used to working on their own and to figuring things out for themselves, so owners have to beware lest they learn things they should not. As a watch dog, their main task was to alert the inhabitants when somebody was coming."

From Wikipedia:  Icelandic_Sheepdog


9/12/18

The Kuvasz coat - Cellini

Andrea of Majna-menti Mákvirág Kuvasz Kennel in Germany shares this photo of her Kuvaszok. 

This photo showcases the distinctive texture of the Kuvasz coat: 

“The hair is wavy and thick, a real characteristic of the breed....The coat of the Kuvasz is very attractive.”

From: Pál Sárkány and Imre Ócsag, Hungarian Dog Breeds, Budapest, Hungary: Corvina Kiadó, 1977, 2nd ed. 1986, p. 101, 103.


9/3/18

Kuvasz "cousin" -- Bob, a Maremma

This is Bob, a 13-week-old Maremma owned by Bradley in western Australia, not far from Perth. His full name is Dellbianco Shade LordofShadow.


9/1/18

101,000 views of Kuvasz Klips!

There have now been 101,000 views of Kuvasz Klips! Thanks for viewing and thanks for sharing your photos!

8/27/18

Lany's 13th birthday

No, Lany did not eat the candle "1" -- she was going after the Dogster Frozen Treats for Dogs that the candle was placed in.
Lany in Florida gets brushed out for her birthday as Maya photo-bombs in the background.

“Aren’t seniors just the best? I think all the years of accumulated unconditional love make them magical " writes Robyn in South Africa to Kelly of Redmoon's Kuvasz Kennel.

8/26/18

Fanny's 13th birthday

Heli in Finland shares this photo.

“Aren’t seniors just the best? I think all the years of accumulated unconditional love make them magical " writes Robyn in South Africa to Kelly of Redmoon's Kuvasz Kennel.


Cili's 13th birthday

Anne in Finland shares this photo of her Cili, when she was just past her 13th birthday.

"Aren’t seniors just the best? I think all the years of accumulated unconditional love make them magical " writes Robyn in South Africa on Kelly's Redmoon’s Kuvasz Kennel page. 

8/24/18

Polish Tatras on parade in Zakopane

Dietrich in the Netherlands shares this video of our Kuvasz "cousins":
Polish Tatras on parade


8/23/18

Barbar and the Kuvasz head shape

Nahimana Onatha in Germany shares this photo of her dog, Kulcsos Lujza Barbar, napping on a chair that's not quite big enough for him.

This photo showcases the shape of the Kuvasz head:

“Although the whole dog is pleasing and well balanced, the most attractive part is the head. This is the Kuvasz’ most distinctive feature.” 

From: Pál Sárkány and Imre Ócsag, Hungarian Dog Breeds, Budapest, Hungary: Corvina Kiadó, 1977, 2nd ed. 1986, p. 101.


"The Kuvasz' head is typically wedge-shaped....The Kuvasz can mainly be distinguished from other breeds by his head shape."

From:  FCI-Standard No. 54


8/22/18

Csermely

Angéla of Nádas-Kincse Kuvasz Kennel in Hungary shares this photo of her 6-1/2 month old female Csermely, showcasing the breed's almond-shaped, obliquely set, black eyes, and black nose and lips.

From: Pál Sárkány and Imre Ócsag, Hungarian Dog Breeds, Budapest, Hungary: Corvina Kiadó, 1977, 2nd ed. 1986, p. 101.

Simba

Catherina in Germany shares this photo of her Simba.

The Kuvasz coat, both young and old

This adorable photo of mother and pup showcases the distinctive texture of the Kuvasz coat: 

“The hair is wavy and thick, a real characteristic of the breed....The coat of the Kuvasz is very attractive.”

From: Pál Sárkány and Imre Ócsag, Hungarian Dog Breeds, Budapest, Hungary: Corvina Kiadó, 1977, 2nd ed. 1986, p. 101, 103.

“The hair should be neither excessively curly nor straight, but should...have waves and swirls.  In 1924, the official term was fluctuosus, ‘wavy,’ which was replaced in 1935 by undulans, ‘undulating.’”

From:  Dr. Tibor Buzády, Dogs of Hungary, trans. Bernard Adams (Budapest, Hungary: Nóra Kiadó, 2002), p. 100.


The Kuvasz coat at 6 days

Kirsti of Talismaanin Kennel in Finland shares this photo of one of her 6-day-old puppies.

This photo showcases the Kuvasz's distinctive wavy coat texture, as well as its slate gray skin seen under the white fur on the ear.


The Kuvasz coat at 11 days

la K. in Hungary shares this photo of his 11-day-old puppies. The fur is already smoothing on their muzzles while remaining wavy elsewhere.

This photo showcases the distinctive texture of the Kuvasz coat: 

“The hair should be neither excessively curly nor straight, but should...have waves and swirls.  In 1924, the official term was fluctuosus, ‘wavy,’ which was replaced in 1935 by undulans, ‘undulating.’"

From: Dr. Tibor Buzády, Dogs of Hungary, trans. Bernard Adams (Budapest, Hungary: Nóra Kiadó, 2002), p. 100.


The Kuvasz coat at 12 days

Paulo V. of Kuvasz-Canil Refúgio na Montanha Kennel in Brazil shares this photo of his 12-day-old puppies.

This photo showcases the distinctive texture of the Kuvasz coat:

“The colour of the coat is a uniform white....
The hair should be neither excessively curly nor straight, but should...have waves and swirls.  In 1924, the official term was fluctuosus, ‘wavy,’ which was replaced in 1935 by undulans, ‘undulating.’”  

From: Dr. Tibor Buzády, Dogs of Hungary, trans. Bernard Adams (Budapest, Hungary: Nóra Kiadó, 2002), p. 100.

8/21/18

The Kuvasz coat at 7 weeks

Gyöngyi of Gyöngyös-Szelek Kuvasz Kennel in Hungary shares this photo of one of her 7-week-old puppies. At this age the fur on the face is smoothing out while the rest of the coat remains wavy.

This photo showcases the distinctive texture of the Kuvasz coat: 

“The hair is wavy and thick, a real characteristic of the breed....The coat of the Kuvasz is very attractive.”

From: Pál Sárkány and Imre Ócsag, Hungarian Dog Breeds, Budapest, Hungary: Corvina Kiadó, 1977, 2nd ed. 1986, p. 101, 103.

The Kuvasz coat - Darius

 Királydombi-Fehér Kuvaszok in Hungary shares these photos of young Darius at 5-1/2 months of age.

These photos showcase the distinctive texture of the Kuvasz coat: 

“The hair is wavy and thick, a real characteristic of the breed....The coat of the Kuvasz is very attractive.”

From: Pál Sárkány and Imre Ócsag, Hungarian Dog Breeds, Budapest, Hungary: Corvina Kiadó, 1977, 2nd ed. 1986, p. 101, 103.