5/20/18

Kuvasz "cousin" - Central Asian Shepherd Dog

Click here for the article: Central_Asian_Shepherd_Dog.

I've found three different uses of the name CAS - (1) as an aboriginal breed, (2) as localized LGD mixes, and (3) as an FCI standard. These are used interchangeably in the research I read, but I'm trying to sort them out, so I can work with the research info.

(1) "Central Asians most likely originated more than four thousand years ago from natural selection in a geographical area between the Ural, Caspian Sea, Asia Minor, and the Northwest border of China."

(2) "This breed comprises numerous breed types. They differ in size, color, head types, and hair types....This breed bears a strong genetic similarity to other aboriginal breeds of Livestock Guardian dogs from that region such as Caucasian Shepherd (Nagazi), Kangal dog, and Akbash....These breed features, as well as different traditional names for the breed, give grounds for complications with breed standard."

(3) "During the era of the Soviet Union, Russian breeders created the so-called 'Central Asian Ovcharka' by mixing several ancestral breeds of Asian molossers like the Alabai of Turkmenistan, the Tobet of Kazakhstan and the Torkuz of Uzbekistan."*

"It is a large breed of dog recognized by FCI (standard 335), as a Molossoid type dog breed of Soviet-era origin under Russian patronage. Numerous breed representatives reside in Russia, and local kennel club officials refer to Central Asians as one of the most popular dog breeds in the country, rating them as the #1 breed in the country around 2000."

*Wikipedia - Tobet


About the family of Livestock Guardian Dogs...

“To this day flocks are guarded in the hills of Asia, Europe and Africa by powerful, robust dogs that are neither clumsy nor pacific. Despite the distances that separate them these breeds have much in common, and the Kuvasz is a member of this extended sheepdog family.”

From: Dr. Tibor Buzády, Dogs of Hungary, trans. Bernard Adams, Budapest, Hungary: Nóra Kiadó, 2002, p. 90.



5/18/18

Endangered Wildlife Trust uses Anatolian Shepherd Dogs in South Africa

The Livestock Guarding Dog Project of the 
Wildlife Conflict Mitigation Program of the 
the Endangered Wildlife Trust:

is a program in South Africa to protect cattle, sheep and goats from cheetahs, leopards, lions, and other predators, while still preserving the predators;  a method to control predation effectively by using traditional dog guarding as opposed to the "useless and unsustainable" methods of killing or removing wild felines. The program has been using Anatolian Shepherd Dogs thus far and is considering adding the Africanis Maluti to the program.

Click here for the article: Livestock_Guarding_Dog_Project.
The Livestock Guarding Dog Project of the Wildlife Conflict Mitigation Program of the Endangered Wildlife Trust has grown in bounds and leaps since it started 7 years ago. 

The large male leopard tracks have been seen on the property recently and with a number of newborn calves the farmer was worried he would lose some. Fortunately Jane has been doing her work and no calves have been lost. Minzi and Juma have been signed over to their respective farmers. They are working well and only one young goat was killed by a small crocodile or water monitor lizard since they were implemented. Both farmers are extremely happy with their dogs and we wish them a successful future protecting their livestock. The EWT Livestock Guardian Project continues to grow from strength to strength.

About the family of Livestock Guardian Dogs...

“To this day flocks are guarded in the hills of Asia, Europe and Africa by powerful, robust dogs that are neither clumsy nor pacific. Despite the distances that separate them these breeds have much in common, and the Kuvasz is a member of this extended sheepdog family.”

From: Dr. Tibor Buzády, Dogs of Hungary, trans. Bernard Adams, Budapest, Hungary: Nóra Kiadó, 2002, p. 90.

Sheep trailing - modern careers as a herder

This an interesting article discussing the use and benefits of transhumance in modern times. LGDs are not mentioned in this particular article, but LGDs are used in Europe for this purpose today.

This article from France focuses on cattle, but includes sheep and goats: 
bovine in the Massif Central, northern Alps and Pyrénées, ovine in the southern Alps, Provence, Pyrénées and Cevenne, goats in Corse and horses in the Pyrénées.

There are nearly 2 million transhumant cattle. In the Provence-Alpes-Côte-d’Azur region, approximately 600,000 cattle spend every summer in the mountain and 100,000 spend the winter in the plains.

How transhumance benefits the environment and biodiversity:


Maintain biodiversity and opened landscapes:
Herds are essential to maintaining open environments. Transhumant breeding is a paragon for environmental protection and natural space improvement: fire fighting contribution, the steppe ecosystem, enhancement of farming fallow land, and maintenance of alpine areas. Since the nineties, breeders have pioneered the various schemes of the Agri-Environmental measures that have continuously succeeded one another.

Click here to see the full article: How transhumance continues to be relevant today


5/15/18

Chart of Caucasian and Central Asian LGDs - all fellow LGDs of the Kuvasz

This chart shows some of the regional variants of Livestock Guardian Dogs in the Caucasus region and Central Asia.

Colossi Asiatici
I più forti in assoluto
Discendenti e razze affini

Asian giants
The strongest in absolute strength
Descendants and related races/breeds

Thanks to Carol in Canada for sharing this, and thanks to Márton Kovács for sharing it on Facebook.

About the family of Livestock Guardian Dogs...

“To this day flocks are guarded in the hills of Asia, Europe and Africa by powerful, robust dogs that are neither clumsy nor pacific. Despite the distances that separate them these breeds have much in common, and the Kuvasz is a member of this extended sheepdog family.”

From: Dr. Tibor Buzády, Dogs of Hungary, trans. Bernard Adams, Budapest, Hungary: Nóra Kiadó, 2003, p. 90.

Arpad and the repairman

Barbara in Ontario shares this photo of Arpad and writes, "It’s getting increasingly difficult to keep repairman if Arpad finds them...."

5/14/18

Central European Sheepdog Conference interview and photos, May 12-13

Founder of KEP, Gyongyi Hajnal, gives a TV interview during the Central European Sheepdog Conference that she founded and organized, held at Szeged University, in Szeged, Hungary.
Click here to see the TV interview: segitotars-a-pasztorkutya


Dr. Buzády Tibor, author of "Dogs of Hungary"

Dr. Buzády Tibor wrote Dogs of Hungary, published January 1, 2003, and printed in 3 languages. The top photo is of Dr. Buzády with his Kuvasz in 1969. The other photos are the covers of his book translated into different languages, and a photo of Dr. Buzády today.

5/13/18

96,000 views of Kuvasz Klips!

000

There have now been 96,000 views of Kuvasz Klips from around the world in 92 countries!
Thanks for viewing and thanks for sharing your photos!

Serbian Kuvasz Club - Klubska Izlozba KKS/Kuvasz Klubkiállítás - 2018

KUVASZ KLUB SRBIJA - KUVASZ KLUB SZERBIA
Klubska Izlozba KKS/Kuvasz Klubkiállítás
Photo by Andrea of Majna-menti Mákvirág Kuvasz Kennel in Germany.

Photo by Paroci Pal.


Kuvasz "cousin" - Tobet or Kazakhstan mountain dog



The Tobet (Kazakh: т бет, IPA: []), also known as the Kazakhstan mountain dog, is a molosser-type livestock guardian breed of dog with ancient origins in Kazakhstan. Its main function is to protect livestock from predators. 

In Russia it has earned the nickname of "Volkodav" which means “wolf crusher”. 

It can be employed to drive flocks of sheep or goats as well as herds of cattle or horses. It is also used to hunt boar together with tazy hounds (afghan hounds). 

This is a large molosser athletic enough to keep up with a horse at full gallop. 

During the era of the Soviet Union, Russian breeders created the so-called "Central Asian Ovcharka" by mixing several ancestral breeds of Asian molossers like the Alabai of Turkmenistan, the Tobet of Kazakhstan and the Torkuz of Uzbekistan. 

The Tobet is one of the original central Asian molosser breeds.

Click here for the article: Wikipedia - Tobet


About the family of Livestock Guardian Dogs...

“To this day flocks are guarded in the hills of Asia, Europe and Africa by powerful, robust dogs that are neither clumsy nor pacific. Despite the distances that separate them these breeds have much in common, and the Kuvasz is a member of this extended sheepdog family.”

From: Dr. Tibor Buzády, Dogs of Hungary, trans. Bernard Adams, Budapest, Hungary: Nóra Kiadó, 2002, p. 90.

5/12/18

History of our Kuvasz - sheep trailing - photos in the Caucasus mountains

The ancient practice of sheep trailing meets modern society as the sheep flock crosses a highway overpass in Armenia on their way to their new pastures.
Dzhan.Russia shares these photos of Caucasian Shepherd Livestock Guardian Dogs walking with their flocks through the mountains of the Caucasus.
This sheep or goat with very long horns is part of a flock in eastern Georgia in the Caucasus Mountains that is guarded by LGDs.


About the family of Livestock Guardian Dogs...

"To this day flocks are guarded in the hills of Asia, Europe and Africa by powerful, robust dogs that are neither clumsy nor pacific. Despite the distances that separate them these breeds have much in common, and the Kuvasz is a member of this extended sheepdog family."

Dr. Tibor Buzády, Dogs of Hungary, trans. Bernard Adams, Budapest, Hungary: Nóra Kiadó, 2002, p. 90.

Happy trio

Antal of Borza-parti Őrség in Hungary shares this photo.

This sweet photo showcases the Kuvasz eyes:
“The eyes are medium, slightly oblique, almond shaped....
The eyes must not be horizontal but set obliquely with tight rims.” 

From: Pál Sárkány and Imre Ócsag, Hungarian Dog Breeds, Budapest, Hungary: Corvina Kiadó, 1977, 2nd ed. 1986, p. 101.

Dishani in profile

Mariette of Kuvasz Kennel vom Quecksilber in Germany shares this photo of her Dishani, an 18 month old female.

“Although the whole dog is pleasing and well balanced, the most attractive part is the head. This is the Kuvasz’ most distinctive feature."
“In profile, the skull is only moderately arched–rather flat, continuing with a smooth line to a hardly perceptible stop and a long, straight nose.”

From: Pál Sárkány and Imre Ócsag, Hungarian Dog Breeds, Budapest, Hungary: Corvina Kiadó, 1977, 2nd ed. 1986, p. 101.

Delceg at 4 years

Branislav of Panonnian White Kuvasz Kennel in Germany shares this photo of Fehér-Morcos Delceg, a 4 year old male in Germany.

“The pleasing appearance of the Kuvasz radiates strength, nobility and an attentive, intelligent character.”

Dr. Tibor Buzády, Dogs of Hungary, trans. Bernard Adams (Budapest, Hungary: Nóra Kiadó, 2002), p. 100.

5/11/18

"It's Friday...!"

Andrea of Majna-menti Mákvirág Kuvasz Kennel in Germany shares this.

Amajlija

Tanja of Bánáti Haver Háza Kuvasz Kennel in Serbia shares this photo of her Amajlija.

This photo showcases the Kuvasz head and ear set:  

“Although the whole dog is pleasing and well balanced, the most attractive part is the head. This is the Kuvasz’ most distinctive feature....The ears are set high on the head. The upper third of the ears slightly stand away from the head but the rest of the leather droops close to the cheeks. They have the shape of a rounded V.”

From: Pál Sárkány and Imre Ócsag, Hungarian Dog Breeds, Budapest, Hungary: Corvina Kiadó, 1977, 2nd ed. 1986, p. 101, 102.


Csinos

Angéla of Nádas-Kincse Kuvasz Kennel in Hungary shares this photo of her Nádas-Kincse Csinos, a three month old female.

This photo showcases the characteristic Kuvasz pigment:
“The skin has a lot of pigment, and is slate grey. The nose, the eyelids and the lips are always black....The pads are dark gray, the nails slate gray.”

From: Pál Sárkány and Imre Ócsag, Hungarian Dog Breeds, Budapest, Hungary: Corvina Kiadó, 1977, 2nd ed. 1986, p. 103.

Ava

Thais of Guardian of the Kings Kuvasz Kennel in Brazil shares this photo of her Ava.

This pose showcases the characteristic Kuvasz skin pigment: 
“The skin has dark pigmentation....The colour of the skin under the hair is also slate grey, best seen on the belly, where the hair is less thick than on the rest of the body.” 

From: Pál Sárkány and Imre Ócsag, Hungarian Dog Breeds, Budapest, Hungary: Corvina Kiadó, 1977, 2nd ed. 1986, p. 101, 103.

Springtime in Quebec

 Marie-Paule Pellerin of Chenil des Grands Blancs in Quebec shares these photos.

Csabos and Muzsa

Isidora of Homokpusztai Haramia Kuvasz Kennel in Serbia shares this photo of Csabos and Muzsa, mother and daughter, enjoying the spring mud.

Maya's 10th birthday

 Barbara in Ontario shares the happy news.

5/10/18

Múzsa

Isidora of Homokpusztai Haramia Kuvasz Kennel in Serbia shares this photo of her 9-1/2 week old female Múzsa.

This photo showcases a happy Kuvasz feature: “The eyes are almond shaped and oblique, which gives the dog a lively appearance, as if smiling; one can easily tell what is in its mind from its lively, rapidly reacting expression.”

Dr. Tibor Buzády, Dogs of Hungary, trans. Bernard Adams (Budapest, Hungary: Nóra Kiadó, 2002), p. 100


5/9/18

Jolly in her e-collar

Eva in Sweden shares this photo of her Jolly looking regal in her Elizabethan collar as she recovers from a leg injury.

This photo showcases the Kuvasz head:
“Although the whole dog is pleasing and well balanced, the most attractive part is the head. This is the Kuvasz’ most distinctive feature....The well-proportioned clean head and the almond shaped eyes indicate intelligence and loyalty.” 

 From: Pál Sárkány and Imre Ócsag, Hungarian Dog Breeds, Budapest, Hungary: Corvina Kiadó, 1977, 2nd ed. 1986, p. 101.

Csalfa

Erika in Hungary shares this photo of Királydombi-Fehér Csalfa relaxing in her favorite pose.

This pose showcases the characteristic Kuvasz skin pigment: “The skin has dark pigmentation....The colour of the skin under the hair is also slate grey, best seen on the belly, where the hair is less thick than on the rest of the body.” 

From: Pál Sárkány and Imre Ócsag, Hungarian Dog Breeds, Budapest, Hungary: Corvina Kiadó, 1977, 2nd ed. 1986, p. 101, 103.

5/3/18

KEP gives TV interview

Gyöngyi of Gyöngyös-Szelek Kuvasz Kennel in Hungary founded the organization Kuvasz és Ember Program (KEP), the Kuvasz and People Program. She gave an interview on TV explaining how the Kuvasz interacts with and benefits modern society. The artwork was done by children at a school KEP visited. 



4/29/18

Kuvasz assisted therapy in Brazil

Thais Rossi Doninelli of Guardian of the Kings Kuvasz Kennel in Brazil shares this photo.
Click here to see more information: