7/16/18

Kuvasz is on list of 17 "adorable rare dog breeds"

To all readers for whom English is a second language: This list is full of baby-talk and made-up words, so don't feel your English is deficient if you can't figure out words like 

LIL' BABY SHNOOKUMS (the Mudi) or 

They're SOOOOOY LARGE and SQUISHY. Like, 14/10 would SMOOOOOSH (Spanish Mastiff) or 

SMOL CORGI/HUSKY BABERS (Swedish Vallhund) or 

They're my honey bunches, sugar plums, pumpy-umpy-umpkins. They're my sweetie pies. They're my cuppycakes, gumdrops, shnoogums, boogums, they're the apples of my eye (Kooikerhondje) or 

BIG OLE FLOOFY CHUMKERS!!! (Kuvasz)

Click here to see the full list:  adorable-rare-dog-breeds


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7/6/18

Kuvasz and Westie take a nap

Liana in Brazil shares this photo of her Kuvasz and Westie snoozing together.

Helpful dogs of many breeds - Terriers near Antarctica

Remember the Maremmas who protect penguins from foxes in Australia?

There are no Kuvasz or LGDs in this article, but it's about a conservation project that uses dogs to help wildlife, just as the Maremmas do in Australia.  

These are the terriers who protect songbirds from rats.


"It took 200 years to rid the island of rats, and three dogs to make sure they were gone." 


This conservation program is on South Georgia Island in the South Pacific Ocean, west of Australia, near Argentina and Antarctica.

"Rats are killing the South Georgia pipit—the world’s southernmost songbird, which doesn’t live anywhere else."

Penguins also live in this area, but they are not threatened here as they are on Middle Island in Australia. Penguins and sea lions are a tourist attraction for cruise ships.

"Dogs have amazing noses that we can’t even begin to imagine or understand, really,” says Miriam Ritchie, a dog handler and trainer with the New Zealand Department of Conservation, who joined the project as a contractor."

Conservationists have long been concerned about the rodents scurrying around the island. The brown rats are thought to have landed in the 18th or 19th century, as stowaways on sealing or whaling ships that stopped there. While black rats on some of the neighboring islands have kept to a largely vegetarian diet, their brown cousins on South Georgia have been omnivorous and indiscriminate, chowing down on greenery, insects, and the South Georgia pipit—the world’s southernmost songbird, which doesn’t live anywhere else. Apparently, rats have a thing for them. “The pipit is almost absent wherever rats occur,” noted Robert Headland, a former officer in the British Antarctic Survey.

To give the birds a fighting chance, the South Georgia Heritage Trust kicked off a massive rodent eradication effort in 2011. The $13.5-million project covered roughly 400 square miles of the 1,500-square-mile island, and had the tenor of a military assault—tactics included flinging millions of poisoned pellets from helicopters. (The pellet rain was a late-summer project, to limit the collateral damage to king penguin colonies that lay eggs there from November to April.)



Helpful dogs of many breeds - Terriers in Hawaii

Henry and Reese are Border Terriers who are sniffing out the remaining rats on Lehua Island in Hawaii.

7/5/18

TBT - Summer fun with Jonas and Maya

For Throwback Thursday, here's a video of 3 Kuvasz friends from several years ago.
Jonas and Maya graciously hosted Miley/Maya in south Florida for a weekend of summer fun. Many thanks to Barbara for inviting all of us.

Click here and turn on the sound for this :59 video with music: Summer fun with Jonas and Maya and Miley/Maya.


7/4/18

Happy 4th of July



Lany wishes everyone a happy 4th!

6/30/18

Working Akbash encounter hikers in Colorado

This article is about Akbash working in Colorado. LGDs are being used more often in the U.S., both in the sheep's grazing pastures in the mountains and in their lowland winter homes (the transhumance process). 

However, most Americans have no idea what LGDs are. When hikers on the Colorado mountain trails encounter LGDs and sheep in pastures that happen to be near hiking trails, trouble can ensue.

This article is informative and makes a good point:

If you love the Great Outdoors, the chances are good that you are environmentally conscious.

Instead of being 'put out,' that an encounter with one of these dogs has altered your day, revel in the fact that the rancher thought to use an LGD. 

It’s the 'green' approach to predator control, and if you’re serious about your commitment to the environment, be glad to see the dog.

Here's more from the article (the underlining is mine for emphasis):

First, for heaven’s sake, keep calm, don’t disturb or frighten the livestock. In short, don’t be an idiot.

As recreational areas continue to expand closer to ranches, encounters between hikers, backpackers, mountain bikers, and cross country skiers are increasing. 

In Colorado, for example, Akbash Dogs have been acquired to guard sheep herds around Silverton and other high-mountain towns, particularly along popular Continental Divide trails.

Contracts with ranchers who have grazing permits specify that their herds need to be at least a quarter-mile from the Colorado and Continental Divide trails, and if their animals are closer, the U.S. Forest Service can take away the  permits, but this doesn’t help if a hiker goes off trail.

Nor does it help when hikers who’ve met snarling dogs throw rocks or raise their walking sticks and wave them at the dogs thinking it will deter them. The dogs merely see the behavior as aggression and do what it take to protect their flock. They attack.

Hikers have described such dogs as aggressive. We don’t agree. We think that backcountry recreationists need to be better informed on how to conduct themselves when encountering LGD, even when both dog and recreationist is surprised to see each other.

Click here to see the whole article: do-you-know-how-to-behave-around-an-lgd-at-work.

Click here to read another article about LGDs and hikers in Colorado:  guard-dogs-continue-to-frighten-hikers-on-high-mountain-trails.

Also see this video about LGDs in the Alps.

The Continental Divide in the western U.S.
Silverton, Colorado, is in the San Juan mountain range within the Rocky Mountains in the U.S.  

6/25/18

98,000 views of Kuvasz Klips!

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6/13/18

Princess Maya

Barbara in Ontario shares this photo of regal Maya returning home from the vet's office.

6/8/18

Arpad and Maya, guardians of the stairs

Barbara in Ontario shares this photo of her Arpad and Maya.

Kuvasz "cousin" - Kato the Pyrenees

Kato was hiking in Colorado when he had to be carried down the mountain by Evergreen Fire Rescue. 


Some funny comments from Facebook and Twitter:

Haha, he found a great spot where he could guard.

Who hasn't seen this in their LGD when they don't want to do something? HAHA!

This is funny!

There's a guy who walks every day with a great big pyrenes and a dog that looks almost like a pyranes. He always has a big old backpack on. I thought for a while that this was because he walked a long distance. Turns out...when his dogs stop and refuse to budge, the backpack has a nice little seat and a blanket and some water and snacks in it so he can just sit and wait till they are ready to move.

I had to carry my 60 lb. pup over two miles on our last hike cuz he gave up. My toddler and I were not amused - his fluffy butt stays at home now - lol

They really aren't designed to be hiking dogs...one of the higher energy non-LGD breeds is a better option.

"Pointless" is a key word here. Ha ha! The activity definitely needs to have purpose to warrant an LGD's participation.

Gotta love firefighters. Best rescue ever!!!!

This dog is me!

OMG, Kato, you do you, honey. You let them humans work for you.

They're buying it. Just a little bit further. Keep a straight face, Kato.

Guess he didn’t want to walk anymore so he didn’t. Typical of a LGD breed. Lol


--- Questions: Overweight, out-of-shape pet? Undiagnosed diabetes? Happy hiker who just didn't feel like going home yet? ---


6/5/18

Fanta

Zoltán of Fehér-Morcos Kuvasz Kennel in Hungary shares this photo of Fanta.

This photo showcases the distinctive texture of the Kuvasz coat: 

“The hair is wavy and thick, a real characteristic of the breed....The coat of the Kuvasz is very attractive.”

From: Pál Sárkány and Imre Ócsag, Hungarian Dog Breeds, Budapest, Hungary: Corvina Kiadó, 1977, 2nd ed. 1986, p. 101, 103.

Suba coat, Kuvasz, Racka sheep

István A. in Serbia shares this photo. He wears a traditional sheepskin coat, which I believe is called a Suba.
Suba Coats are available here for $2,500.00.
Sarica-big-sheep-coat-for-shepherds are from Romania.

Video of modern LGDs with sheep in Germany

This video of Great Pyrenees on the job in Germany is from SCHÄFERSCHIPPE-Manufaktur.

Click here to see the 3:16 video: Schaeferschippe-manufakur


6/4/18

97,000 views of Kuvasz Klips!

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5/28/18

Bendegúz

István A. in Hungary shares this photo of Királydombi-Fehér Bendegúz.

“Although the whole dog is pleasing and well balanced, the most attractive part is the head. This is the Kuvasz’ most distinctive feature.”

From: Pál Sárkány and Imre Ócsag, Hungarian Dog Breeds, Budapest, Hungary: Corvina Kiadó, 1977, 2nd ed. 1986, p. 101.

Delceg in profile

Branislav of Panonnian White Kuvasz Kennel in Germany shares this photo of 4 year old Delceg in profile.

“In profile, the skull is only moderately arched–rather flat, continuing with a smooth line to a hardly perceptible stop and a long, straight nose.” 

From: Pál Sárkány and Imre Ócsag, Hungarian Dog Breeds, Budapest, Hungary: Corvina Kiadó, 1977, 2nd ed. 1986, p. 101.

The new assignment

 Maria in Hungary shares this.

Bugac

Csilla of Kulcsos Lujza Kuvasz Kennel in Hungary shares this photo of 6 week old Bugac.

This photo showcases the Kuvasz's black eyes, nose and lips, and the dark gray claws.

5/26/18

Trio of puppies in Serbia

Tanja of Bánáti Haver Háza Kuvasz Kennel in Serbia shares this photo of her 59 days old puppies.

Bazsalikom

Csilla of Kulcsos Lujza Kuvasz Kennel in Hungary shares this photo of her 6 week old Bazsalikom.

Csinos

Ellen of Cserka DeKuvasz Kennel in Belgium shares this photo of her 15 week old girl Csinos.

5/25/18

Muzsikus

Isidora of Homokpusztai Haramia Kuvasz Kennel in Serbia shares this photo of  Muzsikus, a 7 week old male.


Mother and puppy in Hungary

Királydombi-Fehér Kuvaszok in Hungary shares this photo. It showcases features of the Kuvasz:  

“The pads are dark gray, the nails slate gray....
The nose, the eyelids and the lips are always black.”
“The eyes are medium, slightly oblique, almond shaped.” 
“The hair is wavy and thick, a real characteristic of the breed.”

From: Pál Sárkány and Imre Ócsag, Hungarian Dog Breeds, Budapest, Hungary: Corvina Kiadó, 1977, 2nd ed. 1986, p. 101, 103.

European Union laws on blogs


5/20/18

Kuvasz "cousin" - Central Asian Shepherd Dog

Click here for the Wikipedia article: Central_Asian_Shepherd_Dog.

I've found three different uses of the name CAS - (1) as an aboriginal breed, (2) as localized LGD mixes, and (3) as an FCI standard. These are used interchangeably in the research I read, but I'm trying to sort them out, so I can work with the research info.

(1) "Central Asians most likely originated more than four thousand years ago from natural selection in a geographical area between the Ural, Caspian Sea, Asia Minor, and the Northwest border of China."

(2) "This breed comprises numerous breed types. They differ in size, color, head types, and hair types....This breed bears a strong genetic similarity to other aboriginal breeds of Livestock Guardian dogs from that region such as Caucasian Shepherd (Nagazi), Kangal dog, and Akbash....These breed features, as well as different traditional names for the breed, give grounds for complications with breed standard."

(3) "During the era of the Soviet Union, Russian breeders created the so-called 'Central Asian Ovcharka' by mixing several ancestral breeds of Asian molossers like the Alabai of Turkmenistan, the Tobet of Kazakhstan and the Torkuz of Uzbekistan." [From: wiki/Tobet.]
"It is a large breed of dog recognized by FCI (standard 335), as a Molossoid type dog breed of Soviet-era origin under Russian patronage. Numerous breed representatives reside in Russia, and local kennel club officials refer to Central Asians as one of the most popular dog breeds in the country, rating them as the #1 breed in the country around 2000."

Breed description: "Purebred Central Asians have unique breed characteristics. Breed-specific dog anatomy includes exclusive features, such as very noticeable extremely flexible joints, false ribs, specific head set, and very strong neck with massive dewlap. Expressive, almost human eyes, revealing inimitable intelligence, finish the portrait."



About the family of Livestock Guardian Dogs...

To this day flocks are guarded in the hills of Asia, Europe and Africa by powerful, robust dogs that are neither clumsy nor pacific. Despite the distances that separate them these breeds have much in common, and the Kuvasz is a member of this extended sheepdog family.”

From: Dr. Buzády Tibor, Dogs of Hungary, trans. Bernard Adams, Budapest, Hungary: Nóra Kiadó, 2002, p. 90.


5/18/18

Endangered Wildlife Trust uses Anatolian Shepherd Dogs in South Africa

The Livestock Guarding Dog Project of the 
Wildlife Conflict Mitigation Program of the 
the Endangered Wildlife Trust:

is a program in South Africa to protect cattle, sheep and goats from cheetahs, leopards, lions, and other predators, while still preserving the predators;  a method to control predation effectively by using traditional dog guarding as opposed to the "useless and unsustainable" methods of killing or removing wild felines. The program has been using Anatolian Shepherd Dogs thus far and is considering adding the Africanis Maluti to the program.

Click here for the article: Livestock_Guarding_Dog_Project.
The Livestock Guarding Dog Project of the Wildlife Conflict Mitigation Program of the Endangered Wildlife Trust has grown in bounds and leaps since it started 7 years ago. 

The large male leopard tracks have been seen on the property recently and with a number of newborn calves the farmer was worried he would lose some. Fortunately Jane has been doing her work and no calves have been lost. Minzi and Juma have been signed over to their respective farmers. They are working well and only one young goat was killed by a small crocodile or water monitor lizard since they were implemented. Both farmers are extremely happy with their dogs and we wish them a successful future protecting their livestock. The EWT Livestock Guardian Project continues to grow from strength to strength.

About the family of Livestock Guardian Dogs...

“To this day flocks are guarded in the hills of Asia, Europe and Africa by powerful, robust dogs that are neither clumsy nor pacific. Despite the distances that separate them these breeds have much in common, and the Kuvasz is a member of this extended sheepdog family.”

From: Dr. Tibor Buzády, Dogs of Hungary, trans. Bernard Adams, Budapest, Hungary: Nóra Kiadó, 2002, p. 90.


Sheep trailing - modern careers as a herder

This an interesting article discussing the use and benefits of transhumance in modern times. LGDs are not mentioned in this particular article, but LGDs are used in Europe for this purpose today.

This article from France focuses on cattle, but includes sheep and goats: 
bovine in the Massif Central, northern Alps and Pyrénées, ovine in the southern Alps, Provence, Pyrénées and Cevenne, goats in Corse and horses in the Pyrénées.

There are nearly 2 million transhumant cattle. In the Provence-Alpes-Côte-d’Azur region, approximately 600,000 cattle spend every summer in the mountain and 100,000 spend the winter in the plains.

How transhumance benefits the environment and biodiversity:


Maintain biodiversity and opened landscapes:
Herds are essential to maintaining open environments. Transhumant breeding is a paragon for environmental protection and natural space improvement: fire fighting contribution, the steppe ecosystem, enhancement of farming fallow land, and maintenance of alpine areas. Since the nineties, breeders have pioneered the various schemes of the Agri-Environmental measures that have continuously succeeded one another.

Click here to see the full article: How transhumance continues to be relevant today


About the family of Livestock Guardian Dogs...

“To this day flocks are guarded in the hills of Asia, Europe and Africa by powerful, robust dogs that are neither clumsy nor pacific. Despite the distances that separate them these breeds have much in common, and the Kuvasz is a member of this extended sheepdog family.”

From: Dr. Tibor Buzády, Dogs of Hungary, trans. Bernard Adams, Budapest, Hungary: Nóra Kiadó, 2003, p. 90.

5/15/18

Chart of Caucasian and Central Asian LGDs - all fellow LGDs of the Kuvasz

This chart shows some of the regional variants of Livestock Guardian Dogs in the Caucasus region and Central Asia.

Colossi Asiatici
I più forti in assoluto
Discendenti e razze affini

Asian giants
The strongest in absolute strength
Descendants and related races/breeds

Thanks to Carol in Canada for sharing this, and thanks to Márton Kovács for sharing it on Facebook.

About the family of Livestock Guardian Dogs...

“To this day flocks are guarded in the hills of Asia, Europe and Africa by powerful, robust dogs that are neither clumsy nor pacific. Despite the distances that separate them these breeds have much in common, and the Kuvasz is a member of this extended sheepdog family.”

From: Dr. Tibor Buzády, Dogs of Hungary, trans. Bernard Adams, Budapest, Hungary: Nóra Kiadó, 2003, p. 90.

Arpad and the repairman

Barbara in Ontario shares this photo of Arpad and writes, "It’s getting increasingly difficult to keep repairmen if Arpad finds them...."

5/14/18

Central European Sheepdog Conference interview and photos, May 12-13

Founder of KEP Gyongyi Hajnal gives a TV interview during the Central European Sheepdog Conference that she founded and organized, held at Szeged University, in Szeged, Hungary.
Click here to see the TV interview: segitotars-a-pasztorkutya


About the family of Livestock Guardian Dogs...

“To this day flocks are guarded in the hills of Asia, Europe and Africa by powerful, robust dogs that are neither clumsy nor pacific. Despite the distances that separate them these breeds have much in common, and the Kuvasz is a member of this extended sheepdog family.”

From: Dr. Tibor Buzády, Dogs of Hungary, trans. Bernard Adams, Budapest, Hungary: Nóra Kiadó, 2003, p. 90.